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Tag: electronic

new music: Post War Years, free Live 360 Session EP

Only weeks after my post about British indie rockers, Post War Years’, newest music video (seen here), the band has offered up a free four-song EP of their Live 360 Session. The song for the video, ‘All Eyes’, is on the EP as well as three other new tracks that don’t disappoint. ‘All Eyes’ is probably the most well-rounded of the beasts, but the opening track, ‘Galapagos’, although instrumental, might be my favorite. At just about two and a half minutes long, the track showcases the group’s penchant for ever-evolving uses of electronic-based percussionistic beats. Its name, ‘Galapagos’, does it justice, as one loop of glass percussion – literally a bottleneck effect – is slightly mutated and propagated to create a sonic jungle from a sole, bottlenecked lineage. Add some synthesizer siren calls and you’ve got one trance-inducing island you won’t mind adapting to. The following tracks bring the listener back to more conventionally composed songs with airy vocals that harmonize with metallic bass lines and guitar riffs before ‘All Eyes’ brings the EP to a close. Get a free download of the EP here at the bands site and listen for yourself…trust me, you’ll have it on loop for days.

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Housse de Racket live at 9:30 Club

With a friend this past Sunday night, I saw a show at the 9:30 Club in DC. I would have posted something sooner, but I had to catch up with Mad Men, Frozen Planet, Eastbound and Down, and now, Champions League football. Gotta have priorities. Anyway, the gig was French duo Housse de Racket from the prolific dance-pop label, Kitsune. It was the band’s first North American tour promoting their recent release, Alesia. Just coming up from SXSW, the two were pumped and excited to connect with a new audience, and although I hadn’t heard much about them before the show besides watching a few youtube videos, they were enthusiastic enough to really get the crowd on their side. I must say, I was not convinced by their videos. Too poppy and too many power chords for me, but I was interested in the electronic dance side of their game and telling myself that ‘any live music is good music’. Ultimately, I know that that sentiment is not true, but I am glad I gave them a second chance because they certainly grew on me and the live show does indeed suit them. Not the most complex music, they made up for any frailties with passion and banter, capitalizing on their French accents to play with the crowd. HdR offer great catchy tunes to dance to, and had it been a Saturday night rather than Sunday, the whole place would have been bumpin’. The singer did acknowledge that fact, though, and did his best to encourage people to forget that they have to work tomorrow (if they’re lucky). Having listened more thoroughly, the duo have definitely progressed their sound with huge strides. I would venture to guess that in one more album these guys who’ve played in sessions with other French pop icons, Phoenix and Air, will be able to attract buzz without having seen their fun live show. Top songs for me: ‘Alesia’, ‘Chateau‘, and ‘Roman‘.

new music: Post War Years, ‘All Eyes’

This single and accompanying video by struggling (in the best sense of the word) Londoners, Post War Years, somehow slipped under my radar when it was released in November. It’s a slight departure from the tunes they’ve been putting out the past couple of years. Typically energetic, the boys have slowed down the pace from danceable speed-freak to a methodical sway. The acid-induced video is captivatingly creepy…just the way I like ’em. About two-thirds the way into the song (and video) they reveal the trick up their sleeve, and that’s what I like about the band. They have progressed nicely in the short span of their existence, and they have a knack for incorporating new, smart sounds to each of their songs. Although I would say a track of theirs called ‘Black Morning’, is still their best song yet, if you give it a listen, it’s comprised of a completely different set of sounds from this new single – and I’m willing to bet there’s more where that came from. Keep an eye out for these brits, they’ll be big in no time.